Tag Archives: Economy


David Flynn: North Dakota’s Oil Boom Has Slowed Not Busted

David Flynn: North Dakota’s Oil Boom Has Slowed Not Busted

I am making a presentation to a group of retired UND faculty this morning on the topic of oil and the North Dakota economy. It is more of a free-flowing discussion than a chalk-and-talk format so I will add interesting comments later after I hear them. Oil is clearly a transformative event in the North


How North Dakota’s Unemployment Benefits Doubled Even As The Unemployment Rate Stayed The Same

Earlier today I wrote about a Bureau of Economic Analysis report showing that the amount of unemployment benefits paid out in North Dakota had more than doubled in the last quarter. Yet, even as that’s happening, the state hasn’t seen a spike in the unemployment rate. In fact, according to the September jobs report from


Six Jobs Created In North Dakota/Texas For Every One In The Rest Of The Country

Recently Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm called America’s shale plays “Cowboyistan.” “We’ve got more rigs running than in the rest of the world combined,” he told Forbes. “We’ve got highly trained and reliable rednecks to run them. And unlike anywhere else on the planet, we’ve got property rights, which enable landowners to lease out their


David Flynn: Three North Dakota Counties Responsible For 50 Percent Of Jobs Increase

So yesterday I looked at how the oil patch core counties (Dunn, McKenzie, Mountrail, Williams) are responsible for over 50% of the employment increase in North Dakota in the last year (posting). I thought I would look at those particular counties again and compare to the state overall. I looked at the percentage change of


North Dakota Has Almost Three Job Openings For Every Unemployed Worker

I wrote about the State of North Dakota’s latest job openings at Watchdog.org today: BISMARCK, N.D. — The latest unemployment figures from North Dakota paint a familiar picture for citizens of the oil-rich state. A rock-bottom unemployment rate, and far more jobs than available workers, have become common themes. “The nation’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate