The Deficit Super Committee Is Irrelevant

The premise of the super committee, created by a deficit reduction deal between President Obama and congressional Republicans, was that a small group of Senators and Representatives would hammer out a deficit reduction package of at least $1.2 trillion over ten years (or about $100 billion less than the budget deficit this year) or a package of sequester cuts to Medicare and defense spending would be triggered.

For those of us concerned with meaningful budget reforms, the triggered cuts are probably the best we could hope for. So, personally, I’m rooting for failure and automatic cuts. More likely the super committee will come together on some package that will ultimately be rejected by the overall Congress in which case we’ll get exactly nothing.

Remember that the super committee must make a recommendation to avoid the cuts. That recommendation need not necessarily pass Congress. And even if they arrive at nothing but gridlock, and the triggered cuts set to kick in, Republicans are already vowing to block them.

But, let’s assume the absolute best outcome in terms of actual deficit reduction (the trigger cuts take place), what sort of an impact will that have on the budget?

A very, very small one:

This whole “super committee” debacle has been a waste of our time.

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

Related posts

  • whowon

    No Congress can bind another, and any trigger Congress creates Congress can disable. The increases in the automatic increase plan wouldn’t take effect until 2013 – it will be a new Congress. This is all political theater.

    • VocalYokel

      It’s almost as if it was engineered by Gaylord Countrywide…

  • HG

    That’s what you get from Rino’s — nothing.  Back when this lame deal was struck, the dems were on the ropes.  All republicans had to do was wait them out.  The dems would have caved or the gov’t would have been forced to pay for only the services revenues would afford. 

    • SP

      Ahem.  It’s ‘Rhino’ and they’re almost extinct.  So sad.  People poach them for the horn.  Then the MAIN STREAM MEDIA, the SECULARISTS, and the BROWN SHIRT COMMIES all beat up on em to no end!

      With a spruced up *victim campaign, a Rhino could even be a GOP candidate.
      [ heh. ]

  • Neiman

    I fear whatever cuts are agreed to to will be over time and any increase in taxes will be immediate, in which case, as most often happens – we will get the higher taxes and no meaningful cuts at all. I suspect the GOP will fall for that game again and again. I say – NO NEW TAXES (revenue enhancements of any kind) UNTIL AFTER MEANINGFUL CUTS ARE ACTUALLY PASSED INTO LAW AND ENACTED.

  • Ratbite

    It won’t be long now before our RINO Republicans cave to the Marxist Democrats & vote to raise out taxes & gut our nations defenses. WE NEED A THIRD “REAL CONSERVATIVE” THIRD PARTY NOW.

    • $910553

      Actually, you need guns and ammo now.  Along with a supply of food and other essentials.

      But don’t worry!  There’s no possible way the US is about to enter civil war…

  • http://nofreelunch.areavoices.com/ Kevin Flanagan

    These people have the pathological notion that they can use tax policy to print their ticket to heaven; they are wrong. 

Top