Student Gets Home-Made Lunch Taken Away By School Lunch Inspectors Because It Wasn’t Healthy Enough

A North Carolina mom packed what she thought was an appropriate lunch for her four-year-old daughter. A turkey sandwich, some chips, a banana and some apple juice. But an “inspector” at the girl’s public school (we have lunch inspectors now?) determined it wasn’t healthy enough, so sent the lunch home and forced the girl to eat the school’s chicken nuggets instead. And to add insult to injury, the school sent a bill for the chicken nuggets too.

The incident happened in Raeford, N.C. at West Hoke Elementary School. What was wrong with the lunch? That’s still a head-scratcher because it didn’t contain anything egregious: a turkey and cheese sandwich, banana, potato chips, and apple juice. But for the inspector on hand that day, it didn’t meet the healthy requirements.

See, in North Carolina, all pre-Kindergarten programs are required to evaluate the lunches being provided and determine if they meet USDA nutrition guidelines. If not, they must provide an alternative.

But that’s not the worst of it. Instead of being given a salad or something really healthy, the girl was given chicken nuggets instead. On top of it, her mother was then sent a bill for the cafeteria food.

These are the same group of geniuses who decided that pizza is a vegetable, so of course they know better than we do what is healthy for our kids to eat.

Really, though, is this where we’re at? We have federal agents inspecting home lunches now to make sure they’re up to government standards?

It’s a free country, unless you want to pack your kids lunch. Then not so much.

avatar

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

Related posts

Top