Shocker: Teachers Make 50% More Than Private Sector Workers

The underpaid teachers myth dispelled:

(CNSNews.com) – A new study conducted by the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) finds that, contrary to popular belief, public-school teachers receive total compensation more than 50 percent greater than that of private sector employees – if you take into account benefits, job security, summer vacations and other factors.

“There’s a widespread belief among people — really across the political spectrum — from laymen, to politicians, to scholars, that existing teachers are underpaid in terms of their wages and benefits,” said Jason Richwine, Ph.D., senior policy analyst for empirical Studies at the conservative Heritage Foundation, and coauthor of the study.

“The reality is that it’s just not true,” Richwine said.

Obviously, the teachers themselves (not to mention their unions) are going to disagree, but then who doesn’t think they’re worth every penny of what they’re paid and more? But what’s more irksome than the never-ending demands for more compensation from the teachers (which really aren’t unreasonable, don’t we all want to make more?) is that some think teachers should be paid the same across the nation.

For instance, my home state of North Dakota is routinely ranked near the bottom for teacher pay. This is touted as evidence for needing to increase teacher pay, but really what does it matter what teachers in other states make? If the compensation in North Dakota is enough to attract and keep qualified applicants then it is adequate.

What’s also bothersome is the suggestion that more pay for teachers results in better education. America spends more per student on education than any other country in the world, and yet we certainly don’t rank first (or even near first) in any academic categories.

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

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  • Flyby_Knight

    It’s really too bad you hate children so much.  /sarcasm

  • Waski_the_Squirrel

    Teacher pay is a lot more complicated than this article makes it appear. In many countries (especially those with good schools), teachers are quite highly paid, but there is more to the story than mere cash.

    Of course, one major difference is that other countries don’t insist on so many teachers. I think a high pay would attract the better teachers. Keeping this group smaller would ensure that more students get better teachers and could reduce the total cost. This is a win-win: high pay for teachers and less money spent on teachers.

    Certainly classes would be bigger under such a scenario, but I would ask which benefits a student more: a small class with a substandard teacher, or a large class with a very good teacher? I have not yet found any research that shows any measurable benefit to reduced class sizes beyond about the 3rd grade. It’s mostly “feelings” either because parents like the idea of students getting individual attention, or because the teachers’ unions want more members.

    So let’s increase teacher pay, reduce the size of our teaching force. We’ll concentrate (and attract) better teachers and save money.

    • http://sayanythingblog.com Rob

      I think a lot of what you’re talking about could be accomplished by allowing schools to base pay on teacher merit and performance.

      Right now that is verbotten.

      • Waski_the_Squirrel

        I’m not opposed to merit pay. However, in our drive to reduce class sizes, schools have had to hire more teachers. This dilutes any increase in pay for teachers and does not have any demonstrable effectiveness. The fact is, we have too many teachers in our schools and that’s because everyone loves the emotional appeal of small classes without any facts to back this up. Average teacher salary in North Dakota is low in part because we have too many schools which means too many teachers teaching too few students. Distance is a limiting factor (and I teach in a district that covers over 1000 square miles), but the fact remains that we have education money diluted by too many teachers.

        The studies I’ve read on merit pay show limited effectiveness. In part, this is because many schools implement it poorly. Another reason is that it is difficult to measure good teaching. Not all subjects are measured by tests. Even those subjects which are measured by tests may not be measured by good tests. In North Dakota, our test is based on very poorly written standards. The Common Core will change this, but I see that as federal overreach (a topic for another time).

        In North Dakota, most schools have a small staff. Does a school give merit pay to its math teacher when the school only has one math teacher? If the school compares itself to other schools, do all schools have the same students? Maybe the teacher the year before was useless (that has happened to me). Maybe the bar for merit pay is too low and nobody deserves it.The concept of merit pay is great, but the devil is in the details. Nevertheless, I’m not sure if we’re  arguing from the same side?

        • Waski_the_Squirrel

          Me again!

          A certain segment of the education reform movement sees higher teacher pay as a magic bullet that will improve education. This is probably not the readership of this blog. That’s ridiculous. There is no superman. What we need is better teaching. More money won’t create that.

          Another segment of the education reform movement sees merit pay and school choice as the magic bullet. These reforms are more palatable to the readership of this blog. Again, there is no superman. By themselves, these reforms will not create change.

          We need to improve teaching and we need to give schools and teachers the autonomy to do so (and to hold them accountable for results). These reforms by themselves will not accomplish this. Successful schools become so because of passionate leaders and teachers who push for a good school and work hard to continue to improve. As long as teaching is seen as a low-status job that anyone can do (or worse — a politicized job full of union members) it will not attract the people it should attract. 

          On that note, it might be interesting to look at what percentage of staff in any given school are union members and not union members. In my school, the non-union members outnumber the union members.

    • Hal146

      Nothing will improve until there is adequate discipline in the schools.  Chronic, bad behavior by a small number of children holds back the entire class, no matter the size.  School administrators are largely ignoring this issue because they don’t know how to address it in today’s environment without catching a lot of grief, so it is easier to do nothing.

      • Waski_the_Squirrel

        I would suggest walking through your local school. Some teachers have order and discipline in their classes, no matter what students walk through the doors. Others do not, even with the same group of students!

        In the short term, one disruptive student can be a problem. In the long term, if the teacher and or school hasn’t dealt with that student, they have only themselves to blame. There are teachers  and administrators who choose to ignore discipline because they believe it is easier. The lack of discipline has more to do with lack of guts (and bad teaching) than it does anything else.

        I had discipline problems when I started teaching. Now I rarely have problems and I rarely have to deal with “discipline” because I manage my classroom well enough that problems rarely escalate to the level of discipline. Chronic discipline problems are caused by either inexperience or poor quality instructor/administrator. I’ve taught in 2 states and a number of different schools. Over time, I’ve come to realize that the greatest influence on how much learning occurs in the classroom is the teacher.

        Of course, it’s easier for teachers and administrators to throw up their hands helplessly and whine about how awful the kids are these days. The truth is, they’re not.

        • Hal146

          I agree with most of what you have said, however it is rare that the administration backs teachers who have students with disciplinary problems, they look at it as if the teacher is not doing their job if they ask for help with a problem student.  This dereliction can ruin the entire year for the rest of the class putting them well behind their peers.

  • Jimmypop

    “that more pay for teachers results in better education.” if it was just this easy id be for raising salaries to INSANE levels. i doubt few people with kids would not be willing to spend everything to secure their kids future. the problem is…it seems that the more we pay, the worse the results. very sad.

  • Dakotacyr

    This is hilarious.  The methodology is suspect.But Rob would never question the methods used in the study because after all it is the Koch fundedf Heritage Foundation. So let me ask this:  What is an 8.6 % job security premium? And how did they come up with 8;5% and what other credible study has used a job security premium to inflate salaries.  None that I know of and I’m sure Rob will find me a study.

     How many teachers have been laid off over the last three years?

    WOW, at 50% more in pay, there should be a bunch of 1%ters going after those high wage low work hours teacher jobs. 

    • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

      The teachers are the 1%ers.  Go protest your school and watch how many teachers leave school at 4 pm without taking any work home with them.  

      • Dakotacyr

        if the teachers are the 1%ters, then why are 50% of them leaving teaching in the first five years.  And if teachers are the 1%ters, then why aren’t more people flocking to be one of them.

        You are so silly!

        • Jfisher17

          “Why are 50% of them leaving teaching in the first 5 years?”  Probobly because they’re embarrassed about the product they’re putting out.

        • robert108

          It’s because the Dems have nationalized the schools, and good people just don’t like that.

          • Dakotacyr

            The schools are public,  not nationalized.  Everyone gets a free public education, a national public policy that the public overwhelmingly supports. 

          • Lianne

            I guess you are not in the school system where more and more mundane paperwork is forced upon the teachers rather than allowing them to actually teach.  That is why the good ones burn out after five years or less.

          • Dakotacyr

            Agree.  more mundane paperwork is being thrust upon teachers and they are being forced to teach to the test.  We agree on that.  There are many long term good teachers out there.

          • robert108

            All a result of nationalized education.

          • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

            The school used to be private until the local governments took them over, then the states took over the schools and the federal government is in the process of taking them over.

            So the term nationalized might be a bit premature, but it’s no inaccurate. 

          • Dakotacyr

            the act of the matter is that the public overwhelmingly supports the public school system in this country and will never privatize it.  

          • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

            The public realizes that our schools are broken.  They realize that we are paying too much and getting to little.  The public is beginning to find out that they have been lied to about teachers being underpaid when the truth is much different.

            The one truth to your statement is that the public hasn’t yet accepted that we need to radically change the school systems, but the three above statements make that rather inevitable in the long run. 

          • 2hotel9

            Here in PA the people are yanking their kids out of public schools and enrolling in cyberschool. And their kids are bringing grade averages up within the first few weeks of starting it. So, is the problem parents, students, or public school?

          • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

            Good point.  How can you say the public overwhelmingly supports public schools when so many are trying to pull their kids OUT of public school?

          • 2hotel9

            The constant bleating from unionists is that everyone loves public schools, and the facts don’t support their idiocy. Prior to the creation of AFSCME and other “teachers” unions America had the best public education system on the planet, open to all, with the exception of the areas where the Democrat Party blocked minorities from accessing it. After? We have steadily dropped, and with the creation of Dept of Education that decline has accelerated.

            So, the real question is why are all these unionscum defending their abject failure in public education?

          • robert108

            The Dept of Education is the evidence that our schools have been nationalized.

          • ellinas1

            Rubbish.

        • Waski_the_Squirrel

          Most teachers are leaving because they’re poorly prepared for classroom management. A new teacher is expected to do the same job as a teacher with 30 years of experience and our teacher training system does not given them that ability. A graduated system with a longer internship would help a lot. Better supervision would also help a lot. This includes helping new teachers and regularly observing all teachers. The principal should be a “teacher of teachers”. Instead, they are paper-pushers and the “heavy” when a teacher has discipline problems with a particular student. One or two observations per year do not help anyone.

          If new teachers spent more time learning to teach, they would be better prepared to take on their own classroom. If they continued to get help from their principal, their teaching would continue to improve. Many of the horror stories in the media occur because the principal has no idea what is going on in the classroom.

          Quite honestly, my principal should probably come after me for typing this on school time. (Though, in fairness, my students are out of the room for state testing, and I caught up on my other work.) But…it is November. My principal hasn’t been in my room since March of last year. How does he know if I’m even teaching, let alone teaching well?

          • Hal146

            Eliminating tenure would help a lot too.   If a teacher, regardless of experience, is consistently under performing they should be shown the door.

          • Dakotacyr

            agreed. the need for ongoing teacher development especially in the first five years is critical.  A good peer assistance and review program is essential to a good teaching corp. Teacher mentors, regular ongoing professional development and a strong and fair evaluation system, not the current drive by evaluation will do much for the teaching profession.

        • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

          How does that compare with a number of other careers.  People try it out and decide that it’s not for them.

          After the shaking out period you rarely find a teacher leaving for another job because frankly those people couldn’t find a comparable gig in the real world. 

          • Dakotacyr

            there is not a 50% turnover in any other field that I know of in the first five years.

    • robert108

      So, to sum up your objections, you have no facts or logic to dispute anything here, just your intense dislike of some successful businessmen/employers?

      • Dakotacyr

        Actually I did state a fact, which you conveniently ignored.  I indicated that the study made up a 8.6% job security premium out of thin air.  No other credible compensation has had to make up a statistic to make their case.

        Where are your facts?  Just smearing as usual.  

        • robert108

          I didn’t smear you, I questioned what you said.  I didn’t realize you are such  delicate flower.  The single statistic you assert isn’t connected in any way to the overall study, at least not from you, thus my conclusion.

          • ellinas1

            Rubbish.

          • Dakotacyr

            of course it connected to the study, It is one of the stats used to show that that teachers are overpaid.  Geesh, it is absolutely connected to the study.  It was 8.6% to the compensation of teachers.  You might actually want to read the study.

      • ellinas1

        Rubbish.

      • 2hotel9

        You defeated ec*nt and she was not even in the thread. Once she starts spewing her one word comments she is admitting she has lost, yet again. Good job, r108. And you made duhkotacryer cry. A twofer!!!

      • Dakotacyr

        wrong as usual, I stated one of my objections.  That you don’t like it is irrelevant.

    • Hal146

      Do you buy fuel products?  How many people do you employ in ND or anywhere else?  You are another jealous hater.

      • Dakotacyr

        What are you talking about?  You might want to move to another thread that is more on topic for your comments.

        • Hal146

          I was responding to your brilliantly spelled comment “Koch fundedf”.  So if they are so evil, maybe you should stand on principle and not purchase their products.

  • http://realitybasedbob.sayanythingblog.com/ realitybasedbob

    Nutter “studies” crack me up.

  • http://nofreelunch.areavoices.com/ Kevin Flanagan

    How big of a nest egg would a normal person in the productive private sector need to accumulate to generate the same stream of income the typical retired member of the education cabal enjoys?

  • geoff

    Kevin, we think it’s bad now, just wait till the pensions bust and we have a Government with no money to bail them out. 

    Can’t wait!!!!

  • mickey_moussaoui

    I have a retired teacher living next door. She’s pulling in $42,000 a year in retirement. Not bad considering she could easily live another 30 years. With hind sight being 20/20, I missed a golden opportunity.

  • bottineau bay

    I would be interested in the methodology of the study. Once again Rob posts something with incomplete criteria and questionable origins. It would be fine if he put forth some sort objectivity.

    • http://sayanythingblog.com Rob

      So what you’re really saying is that you want to cast aspersions on the study without actually, you know, looking at the specifics of the study yourself.

      Why don’t you tell us what you think is wrong with it. It’s an open forum.

      • Dakotacyr

        Rob you have yet to explain the 86% job security premium they use in the study that no other compensation study uses.  I told you what I thought was wrong and crickets…..

        • Hal146

          If you have an issue with it, read the study and provide your counter point.  Don’t be lazy.

          • Dakotacyr

            i did, hence the 8.6% job security premium issue in the report that I pointed out was flawed.  How about you read the report.

          • Hal146

            I don’t have an issue with it so I’m not going to read it.

          • Dakotacyr

            thanks for making my point.  You blindly believe anything that is put in front of you.

          • Hal387

            Nope, I already know the truth so I don’t need to read a study that addresses an issue I’m familiar with.  Unlike you, I pay attention to the world around me.

        • http://sayanythingblog.com Rob

          So…job security isn’t part of the compensation packages unions negotiate?  You’re telling us that unions can negotiate to put job security measures in teachers contracts, but we’re not allowed to use it to analyze teacher compensation?

          Give me a break.

          • Dakotacyr

            Give me a break.  How many layoffs have there been. When was the last time you actually read a contract.  This is a trumped up number that has no basis in fact.  You cannot point to any other compensation that makes up a statistic to skew the data the way this study does.  It is not reliable nor replicable in any other study. but then again, it is the Koch funded Heritage Foundation and AEI.  No surprise there what the results would be, bought and paid for by the Koch brothers.

          • Hal146

            “Koch funded Heritage Foundation and AEI”  Ah, I see you are afraid of those “evil” Capitalists.

          • Dakotacyr

            Nope, just pointing out that it was bought and paid for by Koch, so we know what the preordained result will be.

          • Hal387

            Then read the report and tear it apart piece by piece if you already know the issue.  You are not very consistent.  I’m beginning to think you are Hanni, the little fella.

      • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

        One can only assume that either they don’t have the capability of understanding the study so they blindly cast aspersions on it. 

  • http://nofreelunch.areavoices.com/ Kevin Flanagan

    The pensions can’t go bust in ND since the clowns in the legislature forced the private sector to insulate them from market fluctuations.

  • Waski_the_Squirrel

    We seem to have wandered off on a tangent in this discussion, but I am quite passionate about the pension as well. I am a teacher and I resent being forced to invest in TFFR. I would happily invest that money myself and take care of my own retirement. But I don’t get that choice. Apparently, while the state trusts me to teach classes like Calculus and Physics, the state thinks I’m too stupid to take care of my own retirement.

    In my more cynical moments, I wonder if TFFR isn’t part of the state’s creepy symbiotic relationship with NDEA. It provides the state with power over teachers. In return, the state uses the NDEA as the only voice for teachers in the state. 

    • http://nofreelunch.areavoices.com/ Kevin Flanagan

      But TFFR promised you a free lunch; they wouldn’t fail to make good on a promise, would they?

      • Waski_the_Squirrel

        If I believed that, I wouldn’t have so much money invested. I would be living like the overpaid parasite that I hear I am. The state requires a huge percentage of my salary to be spent on TFFR, and has raised the minimum age and increase the percentage several times already. My proposal (give the money to the teacher) costs the same in the short term, but lets the state off the hook in the future. It also removes an incentive for the government to keep so many teachers and schools (who help fund TFFR) and frees up the teacher to move, retire, or change careers as he or she sees fit.

        For the record, I’m not counting on Social Security either. 30 or so years from now, when I retire, I believe I will have only what I have invested myself (assuming the government doesn’t go after that as well).

        • http://Sayanythingblog.com The Whistler

          I looked into it a bit.  Between the school  system and the teacher in the next year or two over 20% of the teachers’ salaries will be paid into the system.  What’s really bad is that the pension amounts aren’t that generous. 

    • Camsaure

      Hell the govt thinks we are all to stupid to look out for or own retirment and thinks they should do it for us. Nice track record the govt has with social security and all other things thet lost and squandered our money on. Yet they think we should send them even more of our money.

  • Dutchsays

    I spent more than an hour reading this study when I got it on my Heritage email. Then I went back and spent another hour and a half scouring it for the methods, data constructs, analytical tools and logarithims by which they arrive at their conclusions. This is the kind of economist’s report which a Fortune 500 company I worked for would have paid in the hundreds of thousands of dollars to have done. Not only the economists’s studies, but several long term studies from several universities, governmental dats from Depts. of Education, Commerce, Labor, Census, and others is analyzed to arrive at and support the conclusions. No doubt this report will be the focus of attacks by the teachers’ unions, liberal mavens, administrations in school districts and State education departments. The teachers do not want this information to become widespread.

    • Dakotacyr

      Oh please, there is no credible study that exists that uses a 8.6%job security premium in their methodology, these guys just made this up.   So much for your expertise.

      • Hal146

        Prove it.  Your opinion doesn’t have any credibility, you have proven yourself wrong so many times.

        • Dakotacyr

          Put up Hal, what have I been wrong on so many times?  

          • Hal146

            Go back and read your recent post where you claimed that no provisions from Obamacare have taken effect yet.  When you acknowledge your error there, we can continue.

          • Dakotacyr

            I never claimed  no provisions of the healthcare act had taken effect.  That is a blatant lie. Now you are just making things up.

          • Hal387

            Yes, you did, and it was only last week.  You are very forgetful.  Remember, I linked to IRS.gov to help you out of your confusion.

          • 2hotel9

            OK. I see the problem! You keep using facts and whatnot, and THAT is why duhkotacryer is in full on screech&wail mode. Start accepting her fantastical horsesh*t and agreeing with her and, SHAZAM, problem solved.

            No, don’t thank me, I’m just glad I could help.

          • Hal146

             The IRS website proved you wrong, you have no credibility.

  • Jamermorrow

    Why do you think everybody coming out of college wants a government job? Finding a job in the military is hard right now. We have destroyed the private sector due to high taxes, regulation, and inflation. The government has been able to stay afloat because we could borrow money. Once that ends the government jobs and pensions will go away.

  • Big Gay Man

    Teachers certainly don’t appear to be underpaid, but this flawed study comes up with absurd figures.  The study didn’t compare qualifications such as college degrees, specific areas of discipline, ongoing education requirements, etc.  It simply compared teacher compensation to the general populace, including high school dropouts.  Let’s see a true apples to apples comparison before we jump to conclusions.

    • robert108

      We could start by comparing hours worked for the pay, compared to the private sector.

      • ellinas1

        Rubbish.

  • http://nofreelunch.areavoices.com/ Kevin Flanagan

    The school year is less than 180 days. There are are even less days in higher education.

    • ellinas1

      So?

  • Dan Collins

    I wouldn’t want my performance judged by my peers or by the luck of the draw.  Teachers have no control over who their students are going to be or how vested the student is their own education.

    • http://sayanythingblog.com Rob

      That’s true, to an extent, but teachers most certainly have control over their own performance.

  • Sue Evans

    I love the picture you used of the sign holder. “SAVE ARE Teacher”..I rolled. That being said, every study is easily constructed and manipulated to state the end goal. These studies are fun to pick apart. 

  • Davoarid

    “The underpaid teachers myth dispelled”

    There is a less than 0% chance that you read the study, or that you could even understand its methodology, and yet you accepted its results at face value, because before even starting to read it you wanted them to be true.

    • http://sayanythingblog.com Rob

      Or, put another way, Davey isn’t smart enough to respond to the study himself so instead casts aspersions at those who see the findings as credible.

      *yawn*

      • 2hotel9

        This is davi. Remember it from about this time last year?  I figure it is a Foreign Exchange student and Progressive activist, since it spews their talking points and only shows up during fall to spring college class period.

      • Davoarid

        Your BEHAVIOR of accepting the study without reading it is the problem, not your IDENTITY as a “right-wing pundit” (or whichever one you’re trying on these days).

      • 2hotel9

        See? It is pushing this “behavior” meme, which is the current justification for illegal activity by leftists in the Occupado “movement” and is being pushed in the leftist/Progressive defense of Muslim terrorism that is coming out of the Arab Spring.

      • 2hotel9

        (or whichever one you’re trying on these days).  And the give away. davi was screeching that you were a “right-wing pundit” when it was here, before. They always give themselves away. Its that rope and hang thing.

    • 2hotel9

      Poor little davi, spewing more gibberish in yet another thread.

  • LMC

    Let’s assume union reactions — warranted or not — are at least expected given their preoccupation with salaries, bargaining rights, and other such issues with which a representative organization must concern itself.  That aside, is this study meant solely to dispel popular opinion?  How can the essential question — “Do teachers currently receive the proper level of compensation?” — be interpreted as anything but a cliche attempt to vilify unions, abolish the current salary scale, and make the case for transforming public education into a private, market-driven enterprise?  This is evidence once again of the over-politicization of education: as issues are politicized, arguments are simplified for the sake of salience, and I think we can all agree that education is far too complex to be dealt with as such.

    Even Milton Friedman, an otherwise staunch advocate for vouchers, charters, and competition, conceded that while some teachers are certainly overpaid, others are drastically underpaid (Capitalism and Freedom, Ch. 6).  The debate must be about effectiveness, not comparability between public and private sectors (dare I say red herring?).

    Perhaps, more than anything, this report is an attempt to skirt the issue of how to define teacher effectiveness, and understandably so if this is the case: it’s highly subjective at best.  But to advocate for across the board cuts is to implicitly argue that teachers’ salaries are commensurate with both their experience AND their skill sets, which is simply not the case.

    Be anti-union.  Be pro-merit pay.  But take caution in falsely comparing teachers’ experience- and credential- based pay scale with that of the market-driven, skills-based private sector.

    • Dakotacyr

      well said.

  • skjelv

    That’s it? 50%?  They should make 100% more just because of the crap they have to deal with, i.e. shitty parents.

  • Jim

    Teachers love to whine about how they are underpaid and over worked.  Fact of the matter is that teachers make more money per day worked that most other professions.  Where I live, teachers work 180 school days a year which come out to 8 months and 1 week of work, almost 4 months less work than everyone else.  Not to mention that the school day from bell to bell is only 6 hours and 35 minutes that is divided into 7 periods.  Teachers can only be required to teach a maximum of 5 periods, which leaves them with 1 period for their lunch and 1 period for them selves.  That results in roughly 4 hours and 45 minutes, of time with students in the classroom.  Teachers also receive 15 sick days and 5 personal days a school year which they can roll over and accumulate endlessly.  I have a friend who is a teacher and makes $60,000 a school year and has only been teaching for a few years.  His per work day pay is equivalent to some one that works all year and makes $87,000.  He has averaged a 6% pay increase every year.  Hypathetically speaking, if he was of retirement status now he would retire collecting $42,000 a year plus health benefits for the rest of his life.  Also, the school district in which I live has a supplemental teachers retirement fund, in which a teacher that has atleast 20 years teaching will receive $30,000 ( $7,500 a year for 4 years) after they retire.  Pretty nice considering all of that money comes from tax payer dallars.   

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