Parents Complain That Christmas Music Is “Bullying”

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I’ve long been suspicious of the anti-bullying movement in our public schools because I think the real goal isn’t so much bullying as stopping some people from saying or doing things other people don’t like.

Case in point, via Aaron Flint, parents at a school in Missoula, Montana, are claiming that Christmas music is “bullying.”

MISSOULA — A group of parents at Chief Charlo Elementary School are so upset over the selection of songs for the school’s holiday music program they are considering legal counsel.

The parents outlined their concerns in a letter sent to the superintendent of the Missoula County Public Schools district, stating, among many issues, they feel the programming is unfair, unconstitutional and is a form of bullying.

“With many of the children in our neighborhood up here being Jewish and Buddhist, as well as a few Muslim and atheist students, we were assured that this year it would be a secular program,” said the letter, which was signed by “concerned parents” but listed no individual names.

So, the message for the kids is, if someone else is expressing a point of view you don’t like you should claim you’re being “bullied” or “harassed” and seek to silence that point of view. Oh, and this process is called being “tolerant.”

Because that’s what tolerance means, right? Shutting up the people you disagree with.

It seems to me that in a free society, in a truly tolerant society, we welcome all points of view into the public square. We create equality through inclusion, not exclusion.

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Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

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