Welfare State Explosion: Food Stamps Skyrocket, Disability Hits All-Time High

Under the president’s FY2013 budget proposal, means-tested spending would increase an additional 30% over the next four years. Such welfare spending refers to programs that provide low-income assistance in the form of direct or indirect financial support—such as food stamps, subsidized housing, child care, disability, etc.— which the recipient does not pay into (unlike Medicare or Social Security).

The total amount spent on federal welfare programs, when taken together with approximately $280 billion in state contributions, amounts to roughly $1 trillion. Nearly 95 percent of these costs come from four categories of spending: medical assistance, cash assistance, food assistance, and social/housing assistance.

Consider the following:

Disability recipients hit record for 192nd straight month. “The number of American workers collecting federal disability payments climbed to yet another record high of 8,830,026 in January, up from 8,827,795 in December, according to newly released data from the Social Security Administration.” . (CNS)

Food stamps skyrocket as unemployment rates remain flat. “From October 2009 to October 2012 the unemployment rate has declined from 10.2 percent to 7.9 percent [the same rate as January 2013]. In that same time frame, nearly ten million new recipients have been added to the food stamp rolls…” (Daily Caller)

Over 100 million Americans are receiving some form of welfare. (The Weekly Standard)

Welfare becoming more attractive than work. Total welfare spending in the U.S. (if converted into cash payments) equals approximately ‘$168 per day for every household in poverty,’ higher than the $137 median income per-day.” (Senate Budget Committee)

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