California is losing the children

In 1970, children made up 33% of California’s population, a number that’s expected to shrink to just over a fifth by 2030, a report by the University of Southern California and the Lucile Packard Foundation shows.

That year California averaged about 21 seniors per 100 working age adults. By 2030, that number is predicted to rise to 36% of working age adults. This birth dearth means there will be fewer people pulling the wagon that state government is inviting more people to ride.

“These trends are not yet widely recognized, but they should be a wake-up call for policymakers,” said Dowell Myers, lead author of “California’s Diminishing Resource: Children,” and a demographer at the University of Southern California.
Indeed, California, the world’s eighth-largest economy, and the most populous state in the U.S., is going to shrink, the consequence of policies that has made it less and less a business-friendly state where families no longer can come to and thrive and prosper.

The state’s birthrate fell to 1.94 children per woman in 2010, below the replacement level of 2.1 children, according to the study, and lower than the overall U.S. rate of 2.06 children in 2012.

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

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