Boy Scouts: No Fatties Allowed

a-fat01a

Chubby kids aren’t welcome at the Boy Scouts of America’s annual Jamboree thanks to new weight standards:

The Boy Scouts of America’s annual Jamboree gives young scouts the chance to connect with other troops under the same set of values established by the organization in 1910.

But this year, the Boy Scouts introduced new standards that ban some scouts from participating in the Jamboree: Their weight.

According to USA Today, tens of thousands of scouts and troop leaders had to undergo a fitness test due to the Jamboree’s physically demanding schedule. Those with a Body Mass Index over 40 were not permitted to attend the summit, which began Monday in the West Virginia mountains.

This really isn’t anything new for the Scouts, given that their oath for years has referenced physical fitness:

On my honor, I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times;
To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.

Frankly, I applaud the Scouts. It takes courage for a private organization like this to hold its own membership accountable for their actions. Whatever we make think of the “obesity crisis” and the various proposals of government nanny statism aimed at solving it, the fact is that being fat is unhealthy (as a fat man, I should know), and challenging these kids to live healthier is a good thing.

If anything, we don’t have enough of this sort of thing in this age of sports leagues that don’t keep score and schools that grade on effort more than accomplishment.

Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

Related posts

Top