100 Year Old Incandescent Light Bulbs Still Work

100yearoldlightbulb

I’m an admirer of technology and the free market. I love how the the constant drive of necessity and invention spurs creative destruction in the marketplace. It’s happening at a more rapid pace in our society right now than perhaps any other time in human history. Cell phones and laptops that are the next big thing one month are superseded, sometimes in a matter of weeks, by the next big thing.

But while I enjoy watching this rapid evolution of technology, it casts technologies that stand the test of time in an even sharper contrast. Case in point, the incandescent light bulb. It was invented over a century ago and, with some tweaks and improvements, is still very much a relevant technology today. In fact, a recently-opened time capsule from the Edison era contained some incandescent light bulbs that, despite being over a century old, still worked:

An amazing story.

What’s irksome is that this technology is currently under attack from the government. It’s one thing to see an older technology replaced because something new and better comes along. It’s quite another to see a technology driven from the marketplace because the government decides they’d rather have Americans use something else.

It took the federal government $50 million in subsidies to create a $50 replacement for the incandescent light bulb which usually costs around $1. And still, I’m guessing most consumers would rather have an incandescent bulb.

Maybe we ought to let Americans make their own choices about light bulbs. As other technology markets prove, when something better comes along Americans will make the switch (and spend their money to do so). But when the government has to push some new technology on us, that usually means Americans aren’t choosing it on their own because it really isn’t better.

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Rob Port is the editor of SayAnythingBlog.com. In 2011 he was a finalist for the Watch Dog of the Year from the Sam Adams Alliance and winner of the Americans For Prosperity Award for Online Excellence. In 2013 the Washington Post named SAB one of the nation's top state-based political blogs, and named Rob one of the state's best political reporters. He writes a weekly column for several North Dakota newspapers, and also serves as a policy fellow for the North Dakota Policy Council.

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